Common Gull - Hebridean Birds
Western Isles Birds - Common Gulls - Hebridean Birds Sightings.

The common gull is smaller than the herring gull. It has a thinner bill than the herring gull. It looks like a smaller gentler version of the herring gull.

It has greenish legs and bill with no red spot will confirm that the adult is not a herring gull - though with practice you can see even at a long range the slim shape and the slightly darker back that this bird is more graceful than the herring gull.
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Common Gull -  Western Isles
Photo Gallery  - Common Gulls
Bird Overview - Common Gull
Family
Gulls (Laridae)
Latin name
Larus canus

 Population
Common


Similar Species
Herring Gull
Kittiwake
Description

The common gull is smaller than the herring gull. It has a thinner bill than the herring gull. It looks like a smaller gentler version of the herring gull. It has greenish legs and bill with no red spot will confirm that the adult is not a herring gull - though with practice you can see even at a long range the slim shape and the slightly darker back that this bird is more graceful than the herring gull.

The plumage of the Common Gull varies greatly and depends on age and the time of year. In the summer, adult birds have blue-grey wings, back and mantle, and white head, neck and breast. The wings have black tips with white spots.

The legs and bill are yellow-green - however, in the winter, the common gulls' bill is duller with a thick black band towards the tip and the head is streaked grey. Juveniles and immature birds are mottled brown. Despite its name, it is not at all common in some inland areas, though often abundant on the coast.



Size
41cm - 360g

Habitat
These gulls can be seen on coasts and waters close to the coast, lakes, lochs etc

Food
The Common gulls eat worms, insects, fish, carrion and rubbish. This gull does not usually feed on young birds or small mammals instead it confines itself to the smaller creatures, like worms, insects and other invertebrates.

Voice
The Common gull is noted for its voice, its calls are high pitched - almost like a cat in distress - an ear splitting sound.
Breeding
These gulls nests are usually on the ground. The Nest is a shallow cupped structure of vegetation or seaweed. Breeding is Mid May to mid June where 3 eggs - olive brown blotched - are laid. Incubation is 24 - 28 days - the young fledge at 5 weeks.

Misc. Info
Living close to the sea it's impossible to ignore the presence of these exceptionally noisy birds the common herring gulls. Being more slim and less clumsy than the herring gulls, they really are altogether a more graceful gull than most and of course can readily seen in The Western Isles.
Common Gull - Western Isles
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