Common Sandpiper - Western Isles Birds - Birdlife and Bird Sightings in the Hebrides
Common Sandpiper- Hebridean Birds
Western Isles Birds - Sandpiper - Hebridean Birds - Western Isles Birds.

A small short legged and short billed wading bird - bill with a pale base and dark tip- often seen in The Western Isles.

This birds upper parts are olive brown, finely spotted - the neck and sides of breast are grey-brown - the underparts are white
        Common Sandpiper Info and Photos
Common Sandpiper -  Western Isles
Photo Gallery  - Common Sandpiper Images
Bird Overview - Common Sandpipers
Family
Plpipts
Wagtails
Latin name
Actitis hypoleucos

 Population
Common


Similar Species
Green Sandpiper
Woodpiper
Description
A small short legged and short billed wading bird - bill with a pale base and dark tip- often seen in The Western Isles.

This birds upper parts are olive brown, finely spotted - the neck and sides of breast are grey-brown - the underparts are white.

The legs are greenish.It has a distinctive flight with stiff, bowed wings.

Juveniles are more heavily barred above and have buff edges to the wing feathers

Size
The adult is 18-20 cm long, with a 32-35 cm wingspan.
Habitat
The common sandpiper is a migratory, but it frequents similar habitats year-round. When in upland areas, sandpipers live along river, ponds, or lakes. In the Western Isles you can see them hopping around the rocks on cliff tops and moorland close to the sea.

Food
Sandpipers are ground feeders that dine on crustaceans, insects, worms, and other coastal creatures. They retrieve them by meticulously pecking and probing with their short bills. Common Sandpipers are abundant but typically feed alone or in pairs.

Voice
The sandpipers sound off with a distinctive three-note, piping-like cry—often represented as "twee-wee-wee."
Breeding
Sandpipers have a breeding song that is a repeated rising kittie-needie. They nest near water. The sandpipers nest is usually a shallow hollow on the ground, lined with leaves and plant materials, under overhanging plants.

Occasionally they build their nests in trees or shrubs or on rafts of floating vegetation. There are usually 4 yellowish eggs with dark mottling or spots. The male does most of the incubation. (21-23 days).

As soon as they are dry, the hatchlings disperse away from the nest to hide among the surrounding vegetation. The male does most of the rearing.


Misc. Info
The common sandpiper bobs up and down continually.It normally looks crouched and often bobs the rear of its body up and down. Its flight is distinctive with shallow, rapid beats interrupted by short glides on stiff, downward bent wings. These show a conspicuous white wing bar.

Lapwing - Western Isles
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